Weather Storybox

WEATHER

  1. If You Want to Hear a Story (from A Library Geek)
    (To the tune of “If You’re Happy and You Know It”)
    “If you want to hear a story, clap your hands.
    If you want to hear a story, clap your hands.
    If you want to hear a story, if you want to hear a story, if you want to hear a story, clap your hands.”
    (Repeat with “zip your lips,” “sit so still,” etc.) (“Opening Songs”).
  2. What’s the Weather flannel (from Stortyime Katie)
    (To the tune of “Clementine”)
    “What’s the weather, what’s the weather,
    What’s the weather, everyone?
    Is it windy, is it cloudy,
    Is there rain, or is there sun?” (“Flannel Friday: Weather” 2012).
  3. Boom, Boom, Boom! by Jamie A. Swenson
  4. If All the Raindrops by Barney
    “If all the raindrops were lemon drops and gum drops
    Oh what a rain that will be
    Standing outside with my mouth opened wideAh ah ah ah ah ah ah ah ah ah
    If all the raindrops were lemon drops and gum drops
    Oh what a rain that would beah ah ah ah ah ah ah ah ah ah

If all the snowflakes were candy bars and milkshakes
Oh what a snow that would be
Standing outside with my mouth opened wide ah ah ah ah ah ah ah ah ah ah

If all the snowflakes were candy bars and milkshakes
Oh what a snow that will be

If all the sun beams were bubble gum and ice cream
Oh what a sun that will be ah ah ah ah ah ah ah ah ah
Standing outside with my mouth opened wide

If all the sun beams were bubble gum and ice cream
Oh what a sun that will be” (“Barney – If All the Raindrops (SONG)” 2010).

  • Who Likes Rain? by Wong Herbert Yee
  • Boots by The Laurie Berkner Band
    “B-O-O-T-S boots!
    B-O-O-T-S black boots
    In my black boots, in my black boots
    I stomp around in my black boots
    In my boots (stomp, stomp)
    In my boots (stomp, stomp)
    I stomp around in my bootsB-O-O-T-S boots!
    B-O-O-T-S brown boots!
    In my brown boots, in my brown boots
    I stomp around in my brown boots
    In my boots (stomp, stomp)
    In my boots (stomp, stomp)
    I stomp around in my boots

 

B-O-O-T-S boots!
B-O-O-T-S frog boots!
In my frog boots, in my frog boots
I jump around in my frog boots
In my boots (ribbit ribbit!)
In my boots (ribbit ribbit!)
I jump around in my boots

B-O-O-T-S boots!
B-O-O-T-S dancing boots
In my dancing boots, in my dancing boots
I dance around in my dancing boots
In my boots, In my boots
I dance around in my boots!

B-O-O-T-S boots!
B-O-O-T-S rain boots
In my rain boots, in my rain boots
I splash around in my rain boots
In my boots (splish splash)
In my boots (splish splash)
I splash around in my boots.

Boots boots B-O-O-T-S!
Boots boots B-O-O-T-S!
Boots boots B-O-O-T-S boots!” (“boots” 2011).

  • When the Wind Blows by Linda Booth Sweeney
  • Whistling Wind song (from Child Fun)
    (To the tune of “If You’re Happy and You Know It”)
    “If you hear the wind whistling, cup your ears.
    If you hear the wind whistling, cup your ears.
    If you hear it in the trees,
    Making music through the leaves,
    If you hear the wind whistling, cup your ears.If you feel the cold, cold wind, whirl around.
    If you feel the cold, cold wind, whirl around.
    If you feel it lift your hair
    Like a kite up in the air,
    If you feel the cold, cold wind, whirl around.” (“Weather Activities & Fun Ideas For Kids”)
  • Hello, Sun! by Dayle Ann Dodds
  • Sun (Traditional)
    “Oh Mister Sun, Sun,
    Mister Golden Sun,
    Please shine down on meOh Mister Sun, Sun,
    Mister Golden Sun,
    Hiding behind a tree…

 

These little children
Are asking you
To please come out
So we can play with you

Oh Mister Sun, Sun,
Mister Golden Sun,
Please shine down on me!

Oh Mister Sun, Sun,
Mister Golden Sun,
Please shine down on me

Oh Mister Sun, Sun,
Mister Golden Sun,
Hiding behind a tree…

These little children
Are asking you
To please come out
So we can play with you

Oh Mister Sun, Sun,
Mister Golden Sun,
Please shine down on…
Please shine down on…
Please shine down on me!” (Mr. Sun, Sun, Mr. Golden Sun | Kids Songs | Super Simple Songs” 2016)

  • Rainbow Dancers scarf rhyme (from Stortytime ABCs)
    (To the tune of “Where, Oh, Where Is Sweet Little Susie?”)
    “Rainbow dancers let’s get ready
    Hold your scarves nice and steady.
    You’ll hear the colors of the rainbow.
    Listen for your time to go.Shake red…
    Shake orange…
    Shake yellow…
    Shake green…
    Shake blue…
    Shake purple…

 

Red scarves turn around,
Orange scarves up and down.
Yellow scarves reach up high,
Green scarves fly, fly, fly.
Blue scarves tickle your nose,
Purple scarves touch your toes.

Everybody dance around,
Swirl your scarves up and down.

Shake purple…
Shake blue…
Shake green…
Shake yellow…
Shake orange…
Shake red…

Rainbow dancers dance around,
Scarves swirl up and down.
Our colorful dance is at an end.
Thank you, thank you, all my friends.” (“Not a Flannel Friday: Rainbow Dancers!” 2012)

  • Goodbye, Goodbye song (by Kathleen Ingalls)
    (To the tune of “Twinkle, Twinkle”)
    Goodbye, goodbye, time to go.
    I had lots of fun, you know.
    We’ll come back another day.
    We’ll come back to read and play.

 

RAIN AND RAINBOWS

  1. If You Want to Hear a Story song
  2. The Thingamabob by Il Sung Na
  3. The Itsy Bitsy Spider (Traditional)
    “The Isty Bitsy Spider went up the waterspout.
    Down came the rain and washed the spider out.
    Out came the sun and dried up all the rain,
    And the itsy bitsy spider went up the spout again.”
  4. It’s Raining, It’s Pouring (Traditional)
    “It’s raining; it’s pouring.
    The old man is snoring.
    He bumped his head when he went to bed,
    And he couldn’t get up in the morning.
    It’s raining; it’s pouring.The old woman is snoring.
    She went to bed and bumped her head,
    And she couldn’t get up in the morning.
    It’s raining; it’s pouring.
    The children are snoring.
    They went to bed and bumped their heads,
    And they couldn’t get up in the morning.” (“It’s Raining, It’s Pouring | Nursery Rhymes | Popular Nursery Rhymes for Kids by HooplaKidz” 2011)
  5. Rainbow Stew flannel (from Storytime ABCs)
    (Sung to “Jimmy Crack Corn”)
    “Take an apple,
    Put it in a pot.
    Stir it, stir it, stir it a lot.
    Take it out now, and what will it be?
    The prettiest red you ever did see!Take an orange,
    Put it in a pot.
    Stir it, stir it, stir it a lot.
    Take it out now, and what will it be?
    The prettiest orange you ever did see!

Take a banana,
Put it in a pot.
Stir it, stir it, stir it a lot.
Take it out now, and what will it be?
The prettiest yellow you ever did see!

Take a pear,
Put it in a pot.
Stir it, stir it, stir it a lot.
Take it out now, and what will it be?
The prettiest green you ever did see!

Take some blueberries,
Put them in a pot.
Stir it, stir it, stir it a lot.
Take it out now, and what will it be?
The prettiest blue you ever did see!

Take some grapes,
Put them in a pot.
Stir it, stir it, stir it a lot.
Take it out now, and what will it be?
The prettiest purple you ever did see!” (“Flannel Friday: Magical Rainbow Stew” 2012)

  • Mushroom in the Rain by Mirra Ginsburg
  • Making It Rain action rhyme (from The Libraryann)
    “Today we are going to work together to make it rain!
    First we rub our fingers together. I think I hear the rain starting!
    Then we lightly clap our hands. It’s falling harder now.
    Lets rub our hands on our thighs. That’s a steady rainstorm.
    Now pat your thighs. It’s raining really hard now!
    Now stomp your feet, too! Oh, it’s so loud!” (“Take an Umbrella…Weather Storytime” 2014)
    (Then go backwards through the motions to make the storm stop)
  • The Deep, Deep Puddle by Jessie Parker
  • The Rain Is Falling Down action rhyme (from The King County Library System)
    (To the tune of “Farmer in the Dell”)
    “The rain is falling down, (flutter fingers down) SPLASH (clap once loudly)
    The rain is falling down, (flutter fingers down) SPLASH (clap once loudly)
    Pitter patter pitter patter (tap legs softly)
    The rain is falling down, (flutter fingers down) SPLASH (clap once loudly)” (“Rain Is Falling Down”)
  • Ruby’s Rainbow by Rosemary Wells
  • Rainbow Dancers scarf rhyme
  • STEM Rain experiment (from Laughing Kids Learn)

 

SNOW

  1. If You Want to Hear a Story song
  2. Snow Everywhere (from The Passionate Librarian)
    “Snow falls on my head. (wiggle fingers on head)
    Snow falls on my nose. (wiggle fingers on nose)
    Snow falls on my boots (wiggle fingers on shoes)
    But it doesn’t touch my toes! (stand and shake head)
    Snow falls on my hands. (wiggle fingers on top of each hand)
    Snow falls on my hair. (wiggly fingers stroke hair)
    Snow falls on my shoulders. (wiggle fingers on shoulders)
    Snow falls everywhere! (wiggle fingers all through the air!)” (“Two Snow Fingerplays”)
  3. Winter Is For Snow by Robert Neubecker
  4. Snow Is Falling (from The Passionate Librarian)
    “Snow is falling, falling down (wiggle fingers)
    Snow is falling to the ground
    Snowing, snowing (say slowly and softly while wiggling)
    Flurries, flurries (wiggle and say really fast)
    BLIZZARD! (say fast and loudly while frantically wiggling fingers!)” (“Two Snow Fingerplays”)
  5. Ladybug Girl and the Big Snow by David Soman
  6. Dance Like Snowflakes (from Preschool Education)
    (To the tune of “Frere Jacques”)
    “Dance like snowflakes,
    Dance like snowflakes
    In the air, in the air.
    Whirling, twirling snowflakes
    Whirling, twirling snowflakes
    Here and there, here and there.” (“Music & Songs : Seasons > Winter”)
    (I also sing “fall,” and “melt” like snowflakes as additional verses.)
  7. Who Is Made of Snow (from Preschool Education)
    (To the tune of ”Do Your Ears Hang Low”)
    “Who is made of snow
    When the temperature is low?
    Who stands outside
    When The ground is cold and white?
    Who starts to melt
    When the warm sunshine is felt?
    Who is made of snow?” (“Music & Songs : Seasons > Winter”)
  8. I’m a Friendly Snowman (from Preschool Education)
    (To the tune of “I’m a Little Teapot”)
    “I’m a friendly snowman big and fat.
    (stretch arms out to sides)
    Here is my tummy and here is my hat.
    (point to tummy, then top of head)
    I’m a happy fellow, here’s my nose.
    (smile, then point to nose)
    I’m all snow from my head to my toes.
    (point to head, then to toes)
    I have two bright eyes so I can see.
    (point to eyes)
    All the snow falling down on me.
    (flutter fingers downward)
    When the weather’s cold I’m strong and tall.
    (stand up all)
    But when it’s warm I get very small.
    (crouch down low)” (“Music & Songs : Seasons > Winter”)
  9. The Snowy Day by Ezra Jack Keats
  10. Build an Olaf flannel (from Highlights Along the Way)
  11. Winter Hokey Pokey (from The Kiboomers)
    “Come outside and let’s do the Winter Hokey Pokey!
    You put your right mitten in,
    You take your right mitten out.
    You put your right mitten in,
    And you shake it all about.
    You do the winter pokey (shiver)
    And you turn yourself around
    That’s what it’s all about!
    That’s what it’s all about!” (“Winter Hokey Pokey | Winter Songs for Kids | The Kiboomers” 2016)
    (Repeat with left mitten, right boot, left boot, winter hat, long scarf, and snowsuit)
  12. Goodbye, Goodbye song

CLOUDS

  1. If You Want to Hear a Story song
  2. Cloud Rhyme (from Preschool Express)
    “What’s fluffy white and floats up high,
    Like a pile of cotton in the sky?
    And when the wind blows hard and strong,
    What very gently floats along?
    What brings the rain, what brings the snow,
    That showers down on us below?
    When you look up high in the sky,
    What is that thing you see float by?” (“Cloud Songs and Rhymes”)
  3. Little Cloud by Eric Carle
  4. April Clouds fingerplay (from Songs for Teaching)
    “Two little clouds one April day,
    (Hold both hands in fists)
    West sailing across the sky.
    (Move fists from left to right)
    They went so fast that they bumped their heads,
    (Bump fists together)
    And both began to cry.
    (Point to eyes)
    The big round sun came out and said,
    (Make circle with arms)
    ‘Oh, never mind, my dears,
    I’ll send all my sunbeams down
    (Wiggle fingers down like rain)
    To dry your fallen tears.‘” (“April Clouds”)
  5. The Cloud Spinner by Michael Catchpool
  6. It Looked Like Spilt Milk flannel by Charles G. Shaw
    “Sometimes it looked like spilt milk, but it wasn’t spilt milk.
    Sometimes it looked like a rabbit, but it wasn’t a rabbit.
    Sometimes it looked like a bird, but it wasn’t a bird.
    Sometimes it looked like a tree, but it wasn’t a tree.
    Sometimes it looked like an ice cream cone, but it wasn’t an ice cream cone.
    Sometimes it looked like a flower, but it wasn’t a flower.
    Sometimes it looked like a pig, but it wasn’t a pig.
    Sometimes it looked like a birthday cake, but it wasn’t a birthday cake.
    Sometimes it looked like a sheep, but it wasn’t a sheep.
    Sometimes it looked like a Great Horned Owl, but it wasn’t a Great Horned Owl.
    Sometimes it looked like a mitten, but it wasn’t a mitten.
    Sometimes it looked like a squirrel, but it wasn’t a squirrel.
    Sometimes it looked like an angel, but it wasn’t an angel.
    Sometimes it looked like spilt milk, but it wasn’t spilt milk.
    It was just a cloud in the sky.” (Shaw 2014)
  7. I’m a Cloud (from Growing Book by Book)
    (To the tune of I’ve Been Working on the Railroad)
    “I’m a cumulus cloud.
    Puffy and floating through the sky
    Piling on top of other clouds is how I like to pass by.
    I can be white or gray depending on what is coming your way.
    I look like cauliflower in the sky, cauliflower in the sky, cauliflower floating through the sky.
    Cauliflower in the sky , cauliflower in the sky, watch me pass by.I’m a stratus cloud.
    Filling up the sky.
    Dark and gray are my colors for I have moisture inside.
    Will it be rain or snow? Only the temperature knows.
    Bringing rain or snow, bringing rain or snow, bringing rain or snow to you today.
    Bringing rain or snow, bringing rain or snow, bringing rain or snow your way.

I’m a cirrus cloud.
Thin and wispy in the sky
Way up high and floating right on by
I signal nice sunny weather.  So get outside to play.” (“Preschool Songs: I’m a Cloud” 2015)

  • Clouds are Floating (from Preschool Education)
    (To the tune of Frere Jacques)
    “Clouds are floating, clouds are floating,
    Up so high, up so high,
    Floating up above us, floating up above us,
    In the sky, in the sky.” (“Music & Songs : Weather”)
  • Cloudette by Tom Lichtenheld
  • Goodbye, Goodbye song

 

SEASONS

  1. If You Want to Hear a Story song
  2. Seasons (from Songs for Teaching)
    “Seasons turn like a big round ball
    Winter and spring, summer and fall.
    Seasons turn like a big round ring
    Summer and fall, winter, springFirst come green buds then comes grass
    Green leaves turn brown
    Fall comes fast
    Winter snows soon turn to rain
    Green buds spring out once again

Seasons come and seasons go
Watch the grass and flowers grow
Winter, spring, summer, fall
And everything’s growing throughout it all.” (Avni “Seasons”)

  • A Friend For All Seasons by Mei Matsuoka
  • We Skate on the Lake (from Storytime Secrets)
    “We skate on the lake
    We shovel the snow
    We warm up by the fire
    We drink hot cocoa
    In winter
    In winterWe hear the raindrops
    We stomp in the mud
    We water the plants
    We watch for the buds
    In spring
    In spring

 

We run on the beach
We melt in the heat
We eat ice cream cones
We wipe sand from our feet
In summer
In summer

We stir apple sauce
We watch the leaves fall
We jump in the leaves
We kick soccer balls
In fall
In fall” (“Four Seasons Preschool Story Time, 8/22/13” 2013)

  • Fall Is Not Easy flannel by Marty Kelley
    “Winter is easy. My branches are bare. (Snow)
    Then, snow starts to melt, and spring’s in the air!
    Springtime is easy. Green leaves start to grow. (Light green)
    Then, spring’s rains are followed by summer sun’s glow.
    Summer is easy. Just bask in the sun. (Dark green)
    Then, breezes blow cooler, and summer is done.
    Fall is not easy. It’s time for a change.
    Green leaves all turn colors, but mine all look strange.
    This isn’t right. (Rainbow)
    And that’s just all wrong. (Smiley face)
    My colors won’t go (Polka dot)
    Where I think they belong. (Candy cane)
    My leaves should be fire, (Hamburger)
    All brilliant and bright. (Zebra)
    And I try and I try, (Cow)
    But they won’t come out right. (Hearts)
    And just when my patience (Jack o’lantern)
    Begins to wear thin, (Fall leaves)
    My leaves all fall off (Ground leaves)
    And winter blows in. (Snow)” (Kelley, 2013)
  • Leaves Are Falling (from Childhood 101)
    (To the tune of “Are You Sleeping?”)
    “Leaves are falling (children stand, hold arms high and wiggle fingers like leaves falling from branches)
    Leaves are falling
    To the ground (crouch down to the ground)
    To the ground
    Look at all the colours (stand and swirl arms all around)
    Look at all the colours
    Red yellow brown
    Red yellow brown” (” 20 Seasonal Finger Plays & Action Songs: Spring and Autumn”)
  • The Thing About Spring by Daniel Kirk
  • There Was an Old Lady Who Swallowed a Frog by Lucille Colandro
  • The Farmer Plants the Seeds (from Childhood 101)
    (To the tune of “The Farmer in the Dell”)
    “The farmer plants the seeds (pretend to plant seeds in the ground)
    The farmer plants the seeds
    Hey ho, the derry-o
    The farmer plants the seeds
    Additional verses:
    The rain begins to fall (wriggle fingers to represent falling rain)
    The sun begins to shine (make an arc with both arms to represent the sun rising)
    The plants begin to grow (crouch down and raise arms as you move to standing to represent plants growing)
    The buds all open up (place hands palm to palm and spread fingers wide)” (” 20 Seasonal Finger Plays & Action Songs: Spring and Autumn”)
  • Zoomer’s Summer Snowstorm by Ned Young
  • Goodbye, Goodbye song

 

WORKS CITED

“20 Seasonal Finger Plays & Action Songs: Spring and Autumn.” Childhood 101, childhood101.com/season-finger-plays-songs-spring-autumn/. Accessed 19 Sept. 2017.

“April Clouds.” Songs for Teaching, http://www.songsforteaching.com/fingerplays/aprilclouds.htm. Accessed 19 Sept. 2017.

Avni, Fran. “Seasons.” Songs for Teaching, http://www.songsforteaching.com/avni/seasons.htm. Accessed 19 Sept. 2017.

Barney. “Barney – If All the Raindrops (SONG).” Online video clip. Youtube. Youtube, 21 December 2010. Web. 17 September 2017.

Carle, Eric, and Eric Carle. Little cloud. New York, NY, Penguin Group (USA), 1998.

Catchpool, Michael, and Alison Jay. The cloud spinner. New York, NY, Alfred A. Knopf, 2015.

“Cloud Songs and Rhymes.” Preschool Express, http://www.preschoolexpress.com/music-station08/cloud-songs-rhymes-mar08.shtml. Accessed 19 Sept. 2017.

Colandro, Lucille, and Jared D. Lee. There was an old lady who swallowed a frog! New York, NY, Cartwheel Books, an imprint of Scholastic Inc., 2015.

Davis, Jacky, and David Soman. Ladybug Girl and the big snow: a story about looking on the bright side. New York, NY, Dial Books for Young Readers, 2013.

Dodds, Dayle Ann., and Sachiko Yoshikawa. Hello, Sun! New York, NY, Penguin, 2005.

“Flannel Friday: Magical Rainbow Stew.” Storytime ABCs, 3 Feb. 2012, librarystorytimeabcs.blogspot.com/2012/02/flannel-friday-magical-rainbow-stew.html. Accessed 16 Sept. 2017.

“Flannel Friday: Weather.” Storytime Katie, 15 June 2012, storytimekatie.com/2012/06/15/flannel-friday-weather/. Accessed 18 Sept. 2017.

“Four Seasons Preschool Story Time, 8/22/13.” Storytime Secrets, 22 Aug. 2013, storytimesecrets.blogspot.com/2013/08/four-seasons-preschool-story-time-82213.html. Accessed 19 Sept. 2017.

Ginsburg, Mirra, and Jose Aruego. Mushroom in the Rain. New York, NY, Simon & Schuster, 1990.

HooplaKidz – Official Nursery Rhymes Channel. “It’s Raining, It’s Pouring | Nursery Rhymes | Popular Nursery Rhymes for Kids by HooplaKidz.” Online Video Clip. Youtube. Youtube, 5 May 2011. Web. 19 September 2017.

Hubery, Julia, and Mei Matsuoka. A friend for all seasons. New York, NY, Atheneum Books for Young Readers, 2007.

Keats, Ezra Jack. The snowy day. New York, NY, Viking, a division of Penguin Young Readers Group, 2014.

Kelley, Marty. Fall is not easy. Johnson City, TN, National Geographic School Publishing, 2013.

The Kiboomers – Kids Music Channel. “Winter Hokey Pokey | Winter Songs for Kids | The Kiboomers.” Online video clip. Youtube. Youtube, 25 November 2016. Web. 19 September 2017.

Kirk, Daniel, and Peter Berkrot. The thing about spring. New York, NY, Scholastic Inc., 2016.

Lichtenheld, Tom. Cloudette. New York, NY, Henry Holt and Company, LLC, 2016.

“Music & Songs : Seasons > Winter.” Preschool Education , www.preschooleducation.com/swinter.shtml. Accessed 16 Sept. 2017.

“Music & Songs : Weather.” Preschool Education, http://www.preschooleducation.com/sweather.shtml. Accessed 19 Sept. 2017.

Na, Il Sung. The thingamabob. London, Meadowside Childrens, 2011.

Neubecker, Robert. Winter is for snow. New York, NY, Scholastic, 2014.

“Not a Flannel Friday: Rainbow Dancers!” Storytime ABCs, 16 Mar. 2012, librarystorytimeabcs.blogspot.com/2012/03/not-flannel-friday-rainbow-dancers-and.html. Accessed 16 Sept. 2017.

“Olaf Printables – FREE Disney’s Frozen Olaf Printable.” Highlights Along the Way, 2 Oct. 2013, highlightsalongtheway.com/free-disneys-frozen-olaf-printables/. Accessed 17 Sept. 2017.

“Opening Songs.” A Library Geek, alibrarygeek.wordpress.com/storytime-songs/. Accessed 16 Sept. 2017.

Owen leoncio. “boots.” Online video clip. Youtube. Youtube, 25 December 2011. Web. 16 September 2017.

Parker, Mary Jessie., and Deborah Zemke. The deep deep puddle. New York, NY, Dial Books for Young Readers, 2013.

“Preschool Songs: I’m a Cloud.” Growing Book By Book, 11 Mar. 2015, growingbookbybook.com/preschool-songs-im-a-cloud/. Accessed 19 Sept. 2017.

“Rain Cloud Science Experiment.” Laughing Kids Learn, 25 May 2015, laughingkidslearn.com/rain-cloud-science-experiment/. Accessed 18 Sept. 2017.

“Rain Is Falling Down.” King County Library System, kcls.org/content/rain-is-falling-down/. Accessed 17 Sept. 2017.

Shaw, Charles Green. It looked like spilt milk. New York, NY, HarperFestival, 2014.

Super Simple Songs – Kids Songs. “Mr. Sun, Sun, Mr. Golden Sun | Kids Songs | Super Simple Songs.” Online video clip. Youtube. Youtube, 3 December 2016. Web. 17 September 2017.

Sweeney, Linda Booth/ Christy, Jana (ILT). When the Wind Blows. New York, NY, Penguin Group USA, 2015.

Swenson, Jamie, et al. Boom! boom! boom! New York, NY, Scholastic, 2015.

“Take an Umbrella…Weather Storytime.” The Libraryann, 2 Nov. 2014, thelibraryann.wordpress.com/tag/toddlers-theme/. Accessed 16 Sept. 2017.

“Two Snow Fingerplays.” The Passionate Librarian & “and it was…Just Right” Educational Consultants, babetter.wordpress.com/rhymes-fingerplays/new-two-snow-fingerplays/. Accessed 19 Sept. 2017.

“Weather Activities & Fun Ideas For Kids.” Child Fun, http://www.childfun.com/themes/seasonal/weather/. Accessed 17 Sept. 2017.

Wells, Rosemary. Ruby’s Rainbow. New York, NY, Grosset & Dunlap, 2012.

Yee, Wong Herbert. Who likes rain? Chicago, IL, Wright Group / McGraw-Hill, 2011.

Young, Ned. Zoomer’s Summer Snowstorm. New York, NY, HarperCollins, 2011.

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I had wanted to do a nursery rhyme theme for a long time for story time, but I was hesitant because I wanted it to be fun, memorable, and unique. Nursery rhymes are so important in early literacy, and many children are no longer introduced to them. I wanted to make sure I had a nice balance between old and new nursery rhymes so everyone felt comfortable, and I wanted to throw in a few fun touches to make it engaging.

We started, as usual, with our opening song–“If You Want to Hear a Story.”

(Sung to the tune of “If You’re Happy and You Know It”)
If you want to hear a story, clap your hands.
If you want to hear a story, clap your hands.
If you want to hear a story, if you want to hear a story, if you want to hear a story, clap your hands.

(Repeat with “zip your lips,” “stomp your feet,” “say hooray,” or any other verse you’d like.)

Then, I introduced our theme. I asked if anyone knew any nursery rhymes. When no one responded, I asked if anyone knew any Mother Goose stories. Still no one responded, so I said that I bet they did and led them in “Twinkle Twinkle Little Star” and “The Itsy Bitsy Spider.” I said everyone knew at least a few of Mother Goose’s rhymes, and we’d learn a few more today.

I asked if anyone knew “Little Miss Muffet.” A few of my kids had heard it, and I said we’d read it for those that weren’t familiar. So, our first book was Little Miss Muffet by Iza Trapani


This is a cute version of this rhyme. It follows Miss Muffet on her crazy journey to get away from all the creepy crawly and otherwise undesirable creatures she finds after she escapes from the spider. It’s a fun and funny expansion of the original rhyme with some entertaining illustrations. It was a hit at storytime!

Then, we stood for an action rhyme. We did “One, Two, Buckle My Shoe.”

One, two, buckle my shoe.
Three, four, shut the door.
Five, six, pick up sticks.
Seven, eight, lay them straight.
Nine, ten, a big fat hen.
Eleven, twelve, dig and delve.
Thirteen, fourteen, maids a-courting.
Fifteen, sixteen, maids in the kitchen.
Seventeen, eighteen, maids are waiting.
Nineteen, twenty, my plate’s empty.

I took out the flannel board next for our version of “Baa Baa Black Sheep.”

Baa baa black sheep, have you any wool?
Yes, sir. Yes, sir, three bags full.
One for the master, one for the dame,
One for the little boy who lives down the lane.
Baa baa black sheep, have you any wool?
Yes, sir, Yes, sir. Three bags full.
(Change color of sheep to green, red, yellow, orange, etc.)

I made sure to repeat black at the beginning and end of the song so they were more familiar with the original version than our fun take on it. This became more important for our last flannel activity.

Our second reading was “Little Bo Peep” from Mother Goose Remembers by Clare Beaton

Mother Goose Remembers is an anthology of many of the classic rhymes accompanied with fun and colorful illustrations. Though it’s fairly simple and straightforward, it was a good addition for a traditional telling of the rhymes.

I wanted to use one fun and unique take on a nursery rhyme, but I wanted to make sure to get the original in there somewhere like Little Miss Muffet did. I found the perfect addition in Cindy Moo by Lori Mortensen. It was our third book.

This is such a fun book that tells the original version of “Hey, Diddle, Diddle.” and then follows a cow who, having heard the rhyme, wants to try her hand at jumping over the moon. After much trial and error and a bit of creativity, she manages to make her dream come true. It’s a very cute story that the kids got a kick from.

Then, we sang “Mary Had a Little Lamb” to return to rhymes they’d all heard and to refresh their memory a bit for our upcoming flannel activity.

I’d originally wanted to include a magic envelope activity for Little Boy Blue that I’d found at Storytime Secrets, but I didn’t end up being able to use it. It’s a very cute idea, though, that I hope to include in another storytime because it’s fun and helps with reading comprehension and literacy skills.

Next it was time for our final flannel activity! I decided to do a Mixed Up Mother Goose FLannel that I’d found at Mel’s Desk. All I did was print out pictures that related to the rhymes we’d used in this storytime, glossed them, added velcro tabs, and voila! I’d made a very simple flannel.

All I did for this flannel was place one piece at a time while retelling a rhyme to test the kids’ memory. For example, I said, “The itsy bitsy SPIDER went up the HAYSTACK.” at which point the kids stopped me and would correct me. I kept doing this until I ran out of pieces. I was able to retell “The Itsy Bitsy Spider,” “Hey, Diddle, Diddle,” “Baa Baa Black Sheep,” “Little Boy Blue,” “Little Miss Muffet,” and “Little Bo Peep” with the piece I cut out. You could easily use other rhymes.

Our last book was Hickory Dickory Dock by Sanja Rescek

This is a simple board book that’s a quick read with colorful and fun illustrations. I just wanted one more quick book to introduce another rhyme before we moved into our active part of the storytime.

To close, we played some of the active rhymes like “London Bridge Is Falling Down,” “Ring Around the Rosy,” and I invented a jumping game for “Jack Be Nimble” that just involved jumping over a paper towel tube with a battery operated candle inside it. In order to pick which child got to jump next, I managed to sneak in one more rhyme–“Eenie Meenie Minie Mo.”

After all that activity, we sat down to make our craft–a cow headband so that we could all be Cindy Moo! I found this craft on SugarBeeCrafts.

Art Story Time

For this storytime, we began with the “If You Want to Hear a Story” song. Then, we talked about our theme by discussing who liked to draw, color, play with play dough, etc. We had quite a few artists. Then, we read our first book–The Day the Crayons Quit by Drew Daywalt.

Because of the popularity of this book, many of the kids had already read it. This is usually a good thing in storytime because they’re typically even more engaged in the story if they’re familiar with it. So, this went over very well. I did shorten it a bit because reading all the notes can take quite a while.

Then, we sang an action song I found on Storytime Katie–“This Is the Way:”

This is the way we stir the paint, stir the paint, stir the paint.
This is the way we stir the paint so early in the morning.
(Dip the brush, paint the paper, blow it dry, etc.)

After that, we did our flannel story for this week–Harold and the Purple Crayon by Crockett Johnson. I really wanted to include this book in my storytime, but it’s so small that reading it to a group is difficult. So, a flannel is the best bet. It’s also a very easy flannel that’s virtually impossible to mess up because it’s supposed to look like a toddler drew it! If you’re new to making flannel stories, I’d recommend this one (though I personally started with the equally easy It Looked Like Spilt Milk for my imagination storytime). If you’re looking for templates and instructions, I went to Storytime Katie’s Flannel Friday.

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After our flannel story, it was time for an action rhyme, so we did “Red, Red:”

Red, red is the color I see.
If you are wearing red, show it to me.
Stand up, turn around, show me your red, and sit back down.
(Repeat with other colors.)

Then, we read Red: A Crayon’s Story by Michael Hall

This is a very cute story about being different and learning to like yourself for who you are. The kids thought it was funny how red wasn’t actually red and had so much trouble. It was a hit.

Then, we read The Dot by Peter H. Reynolds

This was a cute story about how anyone can be an artist, no matter their talents. The kids enjoyed it, and I liked the message about expressing yourself without judgement.

After that, we decided to sing “Shake Your Sillies Out” because we needed to get rid of some energy. Then, we looked at a section of Carl’s Afternoon in the Park by Alexandra Day, but we didn’t go through the entire book. Only one page is really about art. We discussed how the characters looked different in the various paintings the artists had made of them and how they represented different styles of art that we might not have heard about before.

This introduced our craft for the week. I had put together a slightly different craft for them in addition to some coloring sheets. I had just drawn some lines on a piece of paper, photo copied it on white and colored paper, cut out the shapes on the colored paper, and made a bit of a modern art puzzle craft. They could put together their own piece of modern art from my templates. Here is an example:
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We began, as usual, with my opening song “If You Want to Hear a Story.” I introduced our theme for the week (which got quite a few “Ewwws” from the girls in attendance), but I promised that we’d have some fun while reading about creepy crawlies. I even started off with a rhyme they all knew–“The Itsy Bitsy Spider.”

Then, we read Some Bugs by Angela DiTerilizzi
This is a cute little story about finding bugs. It’s a quick read, and the kids liked the rhymes. It’s a nice introduction to the varied world of bugs.

Then, I brought out Miss Edna (as the kids at my first branch named her) my Old Lady puppet. I bought her on Amazon, and I’ve used her many times as an interactive addition to story time. With all the Old Lady books out there, she’s been my best investment because I can use her year-round. This was actually the first time I used her with the original There Was An Old Lady Who Swallowed a Fly story. It went over very well, as Edna always does. The kids love feeding her and getting involved in the story.

After that, it was time for a fingerplay, so we did “Bumblebee, Bumblebee” from Preschool Education:

Bumblebee, bumblebee, landing on my nose.
Bumblebee, bumblebee, now he’s on my toes.
On my arms, on my legs, on my elbows.
Bumblebee, bumblebee he lands and then he goes.

Our next book was Miss Spider’s Tea Party by David Kirk.
This is a very cute book about not judging someone prematurely. It’s a great rhyming and counting book with some very nice illustrations that kept the kids engaged. They eventually felt sorry for Miss Spider, despite her “ickyness” that one child observed.

After two books, we needed to get up and move. So, we added some actions to the “Insects Song” from Mrs. Jones’ Room:

(Sung to the tune of “The Wheels on the Bus”)
The firefly at night goes blink blink blink
Blink blink blink blink blink blink
The firefly at night goes blink blink blink
All around the town

The bees in the flowers go buzz buzz buzz….
The ants in the grass go march march march…
The crickets in the leaves go chirp chirp chirp…
The caterpillar in the field goes creep creep creep….

Then, while we were moving and engaged, we read Can You Make a Scary Face by Jan Thomas

This is a very cute book that you can get active with. The kids loved making the faces and doing all the other instructions in the book. I love it when I find books that get them moving and engaged.

An action song was next, so I went with one of my favorites–“Can You Move With Me.” I used this in my dance story time, and it was very popular. Since it mentions how various bugs and other creepy crawlies move, it fit well with the theme. It’s from Music Therapy Tunes.

(To the tune of “Do Your Ears Hang Low”)
Can you wiggle like a worm?
Can you squiggle? Can you squirm? (wiggle)
Can you flutter? Can you fly like a gentle butterfly? (flap arms like wings)
Can you crawl upon the ground (crawl hands on ground)
Like a beetle that is round?
Can you move with me? (clap)

Can you flip? Can you flop?
Can you give a little hop?
Can you slither like a snake?
Can you give a little shake?
Can you dance like a bee
Who is buzzing round a tree?
Can you move with me?

Since we were standing and having fun, I added “The Ants Go Marching” as a fun action song to keep things moving.

The ants go marching one by one, hurrah! Hurrah!
The ants go marching one by one, hurrah! Hurrah!
The ants go marching one by one,
The little one stops to suck his thumb,
And they all go marching down, to the ground, to get out of the rain.
(two, tie his shoe; three, climb a tree; four, shut the door; five, take a dive)

Our last book was The Very Grouchy Ladybug by Eric Carle

This is a great book about bullying and catching more flies with honey than with vinegar. The kids thought it was entertaining and funny when the little ladybug challenged all the larger animals.

This week we ended with our flannel rhyme. We did “Butterflies” from Miss Meg’s Storytime:

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The first to come to the garden bed
Is a lovely butterfly of brilliant RED
Then in comes another and that makes two
Fly right in my friend of BLUE
“The garden is fine, the best I’ve seen”
Says the butterfly of softest GREEN
Our garden needs a sunny fellow
Fly in butterfly with wings of YELLOW
Little friend of PURPLE, fly in too
The garden is waiting for a color like you
ORANGE, orange you’ve waited so long
Fly right in where you belong
Butterflies, butterflies, you’re such a sight
Flying together – what a delight!

For our craft this week, we made bug “fossils” out of toy plastic bugs and air dry clay. I also had a Grouchy Ladybug craft out for that week that I’d found on Buggy and Buddy.

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Rapunzel’s Revenge

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Hale, S., Hale, D., & Hale, N. (2008). Rapunzel’s Revenge. New York, NY: Bloomsbury USA.

PLOT SUMMARY

Rapunzel spent her childhood in the beautiful villa of Mother Gothel. Unable to see the rest of the world because of high walls, she’s shocked when she finally escapes to the other side and finds the mother she’s always dreamed of in a matter of moments. Her anger leads her kidnapper, Mother Gothel, to imprison her in a tower in the woods. After much time, she finally is able to escape by using Gothel’s own growth magic against her. She then sets off on a whirlwind adventure with Jack (of Jack and the Beanstalk) complete with sea serpents, gun-toting gangsters, witches, and dwarves.

CRITICAL ANALYSIS

The art of Rapunzel’s Revenge is quite detailed from the beautiful villa of Gothel all the way to the final battle. It depicts various ethnicities throughout which is a wonderful addition, despite the Caucasian main characters. It added depth to the story and kept it moving with action scenes.

Setting this story in the Wild West was an interesting choice that gave more variety to this novel than most fairy tale reimaginings. This choice gave color to the language and tone of the story, and it was somewhat difficult to follow for those who are not as familiar with how cowboys might speak. However, the use of Rapunzel’s hair as a lasso was a brilliant choice both for the plot (as it facilitated her escape from the tower on her own rather than relying on a handsome prince) and as character development (as it was a way for her to bond with Mason before her imprisonment). It was a unique choice that paid off in action as the story unfolded.

Rapunzel’s self-reliance is a seemingly feminist choice that goes against the traditional tale. She frees herself from the tower, refuses help when it is offered by Jack, and when men do try to help, it ends in a mess (as seen when the first man she meets shoots her wild boar that she’d been riding). This is a brilliant choice for a book for children/teens today. It’s inspiring to see that not only is she able of handling things herself, but Jack comes to rely on her to save him. This is a great novel for some girl power moments.

REVIEW EXCERPTS

From School Library Journal: “The dialogue is witty, the story is an enticing departure from the original, and the illustrations are magically fun and expressive. Knowing that there are more graphic novels to come from this writing team brings readers their own happily-ever-after.”

From Booklist: “This graphic novel retelling of the fairy-tale classic, set in a swashbuckling Wild West, puts action first and features some serious girl power in its spunky and strong heroine.”

CONNECTIONS
-Have students write their own short graphic novels using fractured fairy tales
-Pair with other fractured fairy tales:
Cinder by Marissa Meyer
Beastly by Alex Flynn
Wicked: Life and Times of the Wicked Witch of the West by Gregory Maguire
A Curse Dark As Gold by Elizabeth C. Bunce
The Golden Braid by Melanie Dickerson
Entwined by Heather Dixon
Towering by Alex Flinn
-Pair with other strong female heroes in graphic novels:
Princeless by Jeremy Whitley
Lumberjanes by Noelle Stevenson and Grace Ellis

 

 

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Law, I. (2011). Savvy. Waterville, Me.: Thorndike Press.

PLOT SUMMARY

Mibs’s family, the Beaumonts, are an ordinary family with a bizarre and magical secret. They each possess a special magical gift unique to them. It appears on their thirteenth birthday, and Mibs’s birthday is right around the corner. Unfortunately, before she can turn thirteen, her father is in a terrible accident that lands him in a coma. Mibs sets off an adventure with her siblings and friends from church (from whom they must conceal the family secret) sure that her new savvy will save her father.

CRITICAL ANALYSIS

The entire cast of Savvy is made of realistic kids and teenagers. It’s easy to imagine them fitting in to (or rather standing out from) any school or neighborhood. There’s the rebellious but secretly sweet teenager, the shy youngster, the sincere and admitted loner (“I don’t have any friends”), the mysterious and charismatic boy with a secret, and more. They are developed and believable as well as relatable to any reader who has ever been different, talked about, bullied, or has been looking for their own sense of belonging or savvy.

Spurred by an understandable desire to save her father and a belief that she has that power, Mibs jumpstarts the story by bringing the reader along on a realistic adventure. Every part of the plot is grounded in reality (or the reality of the story). Aside from the magical elements, this could easily happen in the real world. A child longs to be with her father after a tragic accident and finds any means necessary to get to him which spurs a hunt for them and their “kidnappers.” It’s easy to understand how a child would want to believe that they could help their parents in their hour of need, whether or not they actually possessed a magical ability.

The style of the story was consistent. The language used fit the setting of Nebraska/Kansas, but it can be difficult to follow for those unaccustomed to it.

This is, through all its magical additions, a story of family and belonging. Because of their differences, the Beaumonts grew together stronger than most families. They had to be mostly isolated from the outside world because of the danger they posed to others not in possession of a savvy before they could fully control their powers. This isolation and the mystery surrounding it caused others to pull away and gossip about the odd family. While this strengthened the familial bond, it left the children feeling lost, friendless, and lonely. Mibs wants to find her place in the world in addition to helping the family she loves at a time of crisis. She finds freedom in finally revealing the Beaumont secret, making friends, and letting her guard down a bit. That freedom and a wider sense of belonging is imperative at her age, and readers of all ages can relate to her journey.

REVIEW EXCERPTS

From School Library Journal: “Law has a feel for characters and language that is matched by few. With its delightful premise and lively adventure, this book will please a wide variety of audiences, not just fantasy fans. Definitely an author to watch.”

From Booklist: “Law’s storytelling is rollicking, her language imaginative, and her entire cast of whacky, yet believable characters delightful. Readers will want more from Law; her first book is both wholly engaging and lots of fun.”

CONNECTIONS

-Pair with other teen fantasy:
Princess Academy by Shannon Hale
The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe by C.S. Lewis
Alanna: The First Adventure by Tamore Pierce
The Lightning Thief by Rick Riordan
Inkheart by Cornelia Funke
Once Upon a Marigold by Jean Ferris
The Mysterious Benedict Society by Trenton Lee Stewart
Tuck Everlasting by Natalie Babbitt
-Have students brainstorm what their savvy might be and write an essay.

Happy Star Wars Day! May the Fourth be with you!

I decided to do a Star Wars craft this week for the kids (and the young at heart). I found an adorable and easy Yoda puppet here, and I decided to make a few changes. My final result is below. All you need are some brown paper bags, googly eyes, grey or green colored pencils or crayons, glue, and white and light green construction paper. I drew my templates for the ears by hand and just measured the bag to figure out how big to make the rectangles for the head and robe. This was the perfect craft for all the little Padawans that came in to the library this week!

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