Posts tagged ‘bruise’

Special FX Halloween Makeup

For this month’s teen program, I played to my strengths. As I believe I’ve said, I was a theatre major in college, so I’ve taken my fair share of stage makeup courses. I loved them, and I was encouraged to add a makeup minor by all my instructors, but I never had the time in my schedule. With Halloween coming up, I thought it would be fun to share some of my knowledge about special effects makeup. To appeal to the guys and the girls, I did a few gory makeups and one beauty fantasy makeup. I won’t lie; this would be a very expensive and somewhat difficult program the way I laid it out if you didn’t have any training or makeup at your disposal. I think I only spent about $10 of my programming budget on it, but I already had well over $200 in makeup at home that I wax happy to use for this program.

If you’re still interested, here’s what we did.

I started out with a little talk on the basics of makeup (stage makeup vs. movie makeup vs. Halloween makeup, all the things we can do with makeup, etc.). After that, I had them all sign up for the makeup they would like me to demonstrate on them. Then, we moved on to the first demonstration–bruises.

I chose to do a black eye. I talked about how bruises form, shape, old bruises vs. new bruises, how to blend, back story behind a bruise, etc. I did all the lecture while demonstrating the makeup to help with time. If you want a guide on how to do bruise effects, here is a good one.

After the bruising, I would have demonstrated how to create a scar with nose and scar wax, but I was concerned about running out of our time (I was squeezing all of this into an hour-long program). So, we ended up skipping it. Here is a guide for working with nose and scar wax.

Next, I would have taught them how to do a scrape, but, again, I was worried about time because my next few makeups were very time-intensive and much more impressive. To do this, you really just need a stipple sponge, some red cream makeup, some blood, and possibly some latex.

Then, we moved onto an open wound. This was a real hit with the teens, but it involves latex, so make sure no one has an allergy! Here’s the guide for making this particular wound (it’s very easy, even if you have no real training), and here’s the result (without stage blood).
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While I was in the middle of that makeup, I started my next demonstration because the latex takes a few minutes to dry for both of these. The next makeup I did was a bit more complicated, but if you’re relatively crafty, you should be able to manage it. It does take some prep time beforehand, though. I did a compound fracture. Here’s the guide I used, and here’s the result:

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I always seemed to take my pictures before I added the blood. It really looked a lot better once I added blood.

After those had dried and been finished, I demonstrated my last makeup. This was the one the girls had been waiting for–the pretty one. I did a mermaid fantasy makeup. Here’s the result as demonstrated on my coworker who was volunteered to help me practice all these makeups a week in advance of the program.

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This is another makeup that is easier than it looks. I had to choose fairy easy applications for such a short time limit. Here’s the guide I used.

During the downtime in demonstrations and lectures about anatomy and how it affects makeup application, back story, various tools, other makeup techniques, etc., the teens were advised to visit our two stage blood stations where they could mix up their own realistic, and very yummy sta,ge blood to take home. Here’s where I found the recipes. (We used method 3 “Chocolate blood” and method 14 “chocolate syrup and coffee.”)

I think this program went over well. The teens seemed to love getting all made up and joking around about what had happened to them.

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