Posts tagged ‘YA’

Book to Movie Display

One of my most popular book displays was my first display with 3D elements that looked good enough to eat! I chose to highlight books being made into movies in the coming year or being released on DVD soon. I added 3D popcorn and a few other fun elements to liven it up.

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Mystery Display

The first display I did at my new branch was quite some time ago. After a bit of a delay, I’m finally showing off my handiwork. I was asked to make a YA mystery display.

Fantastic Books and Where to Find Them

With the approach of the DVD release of Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find them, I wanted to do a fantasy display with a catchy phrase, so I chose to tie it all together. Once again, I had to add a few 3D elements with the fire, dragon, and sword in the stone to my display to make it jump off the page.

Teen Romance Display

Before we reopened my branch after renovation and inventory, I decided to change out the YA displays that had been up for a while. I decided with spring upon us, summer romance was on everyone’s mind.

Divergent Party

I wanted to do a program for the upcoming release of the Insurgent movie, so I decided to throw a Divergent party! This was actually my last young adult program at this branch. I’m leaving this position next week, so, though this was a very fun program, it was also bittersweet.

I wanted to design a party similar to the Harry Potter program from last month so that the teens could have a few options for activities and float around to whatever struck their fancy.

I started with a sorting station with a laptop on which I’d pulled up the official faction sorting quiz on the Divergent website. Next to it, I placed some Hershey’s miniatures that were marked for each faction. I got the idea from Inksplasher, but sadly their printable doesn’t work, so I had to format the wrappers myself which involved a bit of trial and error.

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After they were sorted, we had a table for each faction with decorations and an activity inspired by the manifesto of each group as well as their element (i.e. blue water for Erudite, soil for Amity, glass for Candor, fire/charcoal for Dauntless, and stone for Abnegation). First, we had our Dauntless. I decided that since Dauntless values bravery with a bit of recklessness, we would sum that up with truth or dare.

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We also would have done temporary tattoos here, but I had the brilliant idea to buy tattoo transfer paper on Amazon to print out our own instead of buying pre-made tattoos, and ($19 later) I discovered that the inkjet transfer paper doesn’t work even when you follow all the instructions.

Then, we had Abnegation. Since Abnegation is all about selflessly serving others, I decided we’d have a card making station for soldiers serving overseas.

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Next was the Amity station. I decided we’d sum up friendship with a friendship bracelet making station.

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Then came Erudite with a bit of trivia as well as some free bookmarks for our friends who value knowledge above all else.

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Finally, we had Candor with a game of would you rather which forced the players to be honest about their choices and summed up the emphasis on honesty perfectly.

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For our Divergent table (for those who fit into more than one faction), we had Cranium since it basically combined all the different factions. If you’re not familiar with Cranium, it is like Trivial Pursuit, Pictionary, charades, and a few other games all rolled into one.

Overall, this was a pretty cheap program. I think the total (minus the tattoo transfer paper that didn’t work) was about $20, and we had a nice turnout since I timed it so close to the movie release.

 

Family Feud

My teens love game show programs as we saw with my Minute to Win It program. We’ve done Jeopardy at my branch in the past, so I wanted to find a new game show to do to keep interest up (and because I was personally a little burned out on Jeopardy). When I brought up the idea of Family Feud, there was a lot of excitement, so I went for it. It was a very easy and very cheap program. I just spent about $5 on snacks and drinks from the dollar store and about $5 on prizes (which weren’t even necessary since we don’t typically give out prizes to winners at competition programs; instead they usually “win” the thrill of victory).

For this program, I found a pre-made Family Feud Powerpoint here. I used the first one, but I’ll tell you now that it’s a bit difficult. You have to follow their instructions precisely on the site, and you can’t edit it to have more or fewer answers than are already displayed. So, you have to make sure you’re using questions with the same number of answers when you plug in your own. In addition, there’s a bit of a glitch where it will show all the answers for a split second when you go to a new round before covering them up. I had to get a bit creative here and made signs that everyone had to put up in front of their faces whenever I switched slides. It can be a bit glitchy on some computers too, so make sure to test it on the computer you’ll be using. Other than that, however, it worked great! It looked very realistic, and everyone loved the music and animation.

For my questions, I did not go out and poll 100 people. There are a couple of sites who have already done this, and I just used the questions and answers I thought my teens would be more likely to know (and which were appropriate) to plug into my Powerpoint. Here’s one site, and here’s another.

Overall, it was a very popular program with one of my highest turnouts ever!

Stained Glass Ornaments

My December YA program was very simple. I’ve never been big on craft programs because most of the crafts I like and think the teens like have been done to death (tie dye, jewelry, etc.) or are not very inclusive for the guys in the group. So, when I wanted to do a craft program, I wanted to do something very different. Well, that didn’t necessarily happen since almost every library offers an ornament decorating program (my branch alone offered two–one for adults and my program for teens). However, I decided we should do something new that I’d just learned about.

Alcohol inks are the craft supplies for the crafting impaired. (Yes, I include myself among that number.) It’s virtually impossible to screw it up, but if you manage to do it (I did), you just use the blending solution to wipe away the mess and start all over. There’s virtually no wasted supplies! That definitely appealed to me.

So, I went out and bought 3 packs of various colored alcohol inks and metallic mixers as well as two containers of alcohol inks. I’m not going to lie. This was a fairly expensive program. I think the total for ink and other alcohol ink supplies was about $40 or more at Hobby Lobby (our Michaels didn’t carry alcohol inks and the people at Joann’s didn’t know what I was even talking about when I asked). I ended up saving money by using leftover bulbs from the other ornament decorating program at my branch. So, my total for this program was about $45 with snacks.

If you’re not familiar with alcohol inks, I’d suggest reading up on them at All Thumbs Crafts, Art Without Anxiety, or By Stephanie Lynn. Then practice, practice, practice. There are a bunch of techniques, and each one turns out differently, so you’ll want a few examples and a few tips and tricks to pass along during the program.

Because the inks themselves were so expensive (and I have read that you can make your own from permanent markers or something and that certain rubbing alcohols can be replaced for the blending solution but I didn’t try it because I know my luck at trying to be cheap with things like this and my budget last semester allowed me to use the real stuff), I ordered a box of gloves from the programming department for free to make sure my teens didn’t get the ink on their hands (because it is a big pain to get off, believe me!) and made my own applicators from extra felt scraps left over from making flannels and handles made from cardboard scraps. You can also use felt attached to a stamp base, but I didn’t have those on hand this time.

Then, I warned the kids to wear old clothes, put out some snacks, set up the work stations with q-tips, cotton balls, some applicators, bowls for mixing the metallic additives, a pie plate to work over, lots of newspaper and wax paper, and let the teens get creative. There were some really beautiful pieces made at this program (much better than I made during my experiments), and the teens seemed to really enjoy it.

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